A Pen That Works

You'll need something to write down notes during your interview, for your own information and if there's anything that triggers questions you may want to save for the end. Just be sure to scribble before you leave the house so you're not stuck with a useless pen.

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FlowerQueen FlowerQueen 5 years
Also, bring extra clothes. Never know what might happen.
mtblues mtblues 5 years
Don't forget the Thank You card. Have it pre-addressed and stamped. Add your personalized note from the interview and drop it in the mail ASAP after the interview.
LadyT TNT LadyT TNT 5 years
Also bring a copy of the job description if available. Research the company prior to going. Turn off your cell. Don't chew gum. Do not arrive with an entourage. "Tell me about yourself" means "tell me what your attributes are that will apply to this job." "What are your weaknesses" is "what do you need to improve on as well as what steps you are taking to accomplish it." Make sure you ask questions to show interest in more than just the paycheck-- even if that's your only motivation: 1. Why is this position open? 2. Do you have any internal candidates (if it's not entry level why have they not promoted someone to this position)? 3. Once I've learned the functions of the position, what is the desired next step in my duties? 4. Will (name of company) be open to suggestions if I see an area I can help improve? Then the basic end of interview questions: How far along are you in the interview process? When may I follow up with you? Be sure to get the interviewer's card to send a thank you note for the interview.
Bibliophile2 Bibliophile2 5 years
I definitely agree, extra copies of resume', *references, map, phone number, pen, even a pencil --- I've been caught without references, raced to print out more & run back to give them within 24 hours, what a pest, and it couldn't have looked that good --- Definitely I agree must have the addresses, phone #s and month/years worked also --- To expand on the suggestions made above to have answers in a notebook ready for how you'd describe yourself --- that question is sometimes narrowed down to: "WHAT ARE THREE WORDS OR TERMS YOU'D USE TO DESCRIBE YOURSELF?" And it's definitely better to have that thought out so you don't sound like an idiot or an egomaniac... ALSO -- WHAT ARE YOUR WORST AREAS/WEAKNESSES? IF they ask that, that's another doozy to be prepared for. **Nothing wrong with admitting you've learned from mistakes, or that you're a "quick study" in areas where you might need a bit more experience, whether technology or management or whatever.... If you're willing to take a course to learn a program, or put in your own time to do that if it appears that particular skill is a pre-requisite, that also shows you'll continually be willing to learn & keep up. (As long as you're not setting y ourself up to be taken advantage of either, putting in your own time, that's the only risk with that offer.)
LoveConstant LoveConstant 5 years
These are great suggestions -- I think you could add to the list a computer-generated map of your route to the interview. It's also a good idea to visit the location a day or two before the interview to get the 'lay of the land', i.e., where to park, which door to use, use of metal detectors, elevator logistics, etc. Depending on the job for which you're applying, be sure to ask the interviewer if there is anything he/she would like you to bring such as copies of reports you've written, spreadsheets you've generated, graphics you've designed or any portfolio-type projects that will help to showcase your skills and abilities.
snowflake1 snowflake1 5 years
i agree. I also hate when the interviewer says "so, tell me about yourself" with all the laws and stuff, it is hard for me to get out what i want them to know without sounding like a kiss*** Another good tip is in your portfolio, write down the addresses and phone numbers of your previous employers. Oftentimes, they ask you to fill out an application prior to the interview.
snowflake1 snowflake1 5 years
i agree. I also hate when the interviewer says "so, tell me about yourself" with all the laws and stuff, it is hard for me to get out what i want them to know without sounding like a kiss*** Another good tip is in your portfolio, write down the addresses and phone numbers of your previous employers. Oftentimes, they ask you to fill out an application prior to the interview.
ilanac13 ilanac13 5 years
these are common sense - but they are also really smart. the one thing that always trips me up when i'm in an interview is the question thing. i know what things i'd like to know, but there's not always the right time to ask those sorts of things if it's a first round interview. i like to know what it's REALLY like working there, and what the day to day is like and all that - but when you're having a first interview, it's not always the right place. i DO think that it's a good idea to have all the added 'paperwork' with you - cause that's something that's key when you're meeting with HR and the department. have several copies on hand.